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Guest Lecture - "The Terabit/Second Quest" by Prof Gordon Brebner

It is now forecast that Terabit Ethernet will be needed in 2015 or so. (A 1 Tb/s data rate means that the estimated memory capacity of a typical human could be transmitted in 24 seconds.) Professor Gordon Brebner, a Distinguished Engineer at Xilinx, Inc will be give a Guest Lecture at UCL on 8th March discussing the quest for ever increasing data rates.
When Mar 08, 2012
from 02:00 PM to 03:00 PM
Where Barlow Room, Level 8, Roberts Building
Attendees All academic staff and postgraduates associated with the Centre for Doctoral Training.
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Abstract

It is now forecast that Terabit Ethernet will be needed in 2015 or so. (A 1 Tb/s data rate means that the estimated memory capacity of a typical human could be transmitted in 24 seconds.) In this talk, I will give an overview of research which has demonstrated that Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices can be the main processing component for 100-200 Gb/s networking, a current event horizon, and points the way to how techniques might scale (or not) towards a 1 Tb/s transmission rate by 2015. The highly configurable, and reconfigurable, characteristics of such devices make them a unique technology that fits with the requirements for extremely high performance and moreover for flexibility and programmability. Aside from discussing the physical technological properties, the talk will overview work on higher-level programming models that can make the technology more accessible to networking experts, as opposed to hardware/FPGA experts.

Speaker Biography

Gordon Brebner is a Distinguished Engineer at Xilinx, Inc., the worldwide leader in programmable logic platforms.  He works in Xilinx Labs in San José, California, USA, leading an international group researching issues surrounding networked processing systems of the future.  His main personal research interests concern dynamically reconfigurable architectures, domain-specific languages with highly concurrent implementations, and high performance networking and telecommunications, with also a historical interest in computational complexity.  He has authored numerous papers and the book "Computers in Communication", and holds many patents.  Prior to joining Xilinx in 2002, Gordon was the Professor of Computer Systems at the University of Edinburgh, directing the Institute for Computing Systems Architecture.  He continues to be an Honorary Professor at the University of Edinburgh, is a Ph.D. supervisor at Santa Clara University and University of Southern California, and is a visiting lecturer at Stanford University.